AUSTRALIA POLITICS: Turnbull Mulls Contentious Cybersecurity Law

Politicoscope
By Politicoscope July 14, 2017 12:37
MOST POPULAR YOU MAY LIKE

POLITICS HOME: Current Political Article


Australian government on Friday proposed a new cybersecurity law to force global technology companies such as Facebook and Google to help police by unscrambling encrypted messages sent by suspected extremists and other criminals.

Continue below with the full current political topic.

AUSTRALIA POLITICS: Turnbull Mulls Contentious Cybersecurity Law

The Australian government on Friday proposed a new cybersecurity law to force global technology companies such as Facebook and Google to help police by unscrambling encrypted messages sent by suspected extremists and other criminals.

But some experts, as well as Facebook, warned that weakening end-to-end encryption services so that police could eavesdrop would leave communications vulnerable to hackers.

The new law would be modeled on Britain’s Investigatory Powers Act, which was passed by the British Parliament in November last year and gave intelligence agencies some of the most extensive surveillance powers in the Western world, the government said.

The Australian bill that would allow courts to order tech companies to quickly unlock communications will be introduced to parliament by November, officials said.

Under the law, internet companies would have the same obligations telephone companies do to help law enforcement agencies, Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull said. Law enforcement agencies would need warrants to access the communications.

“We’ve got a real problem in that the law enforcement agencies are increasingly unable to find out what terrorists and drug traffickers and pedophile rings are up to because of the very high levels of encryption,” Turnbull told reporters.

“Where we can compel it, we will, but we will need the cooperation from the tech companies,” he added.

The government expected resistance from some tech companies, many of them based in the United States. But the companies “know morally they should” cooperate, Turnbull said.

“We need to say with one voice to Silicon Valley and its emulators: ‘All right, you’ve devised these great platforms, now you’ve got to help us to ensure that the rule of law prevails,'” he added.

Facebook said it had a protocol to respond to requests for police help. But the social media giant said it could not read individual encrypted messages.

“Weakening encrypted systems for them (police) would mean weakening it for everyone,” a Facebook statement said on Friday.

Australia was a major driver of a statement agreed at the Group of 20 leaders’ summit in Germany last week that called on the tech industry to provide “lawful and non-arbitrary access to available information” needed to protect against terrorist threats.

The Australian Federal Police say the proportion of communication traffic they monitor that was encrypted had grown from 3 percent to more than 55 percent in only a few years.

Police say 65 percent of organized crime investigations, including regarding terrorism and pedophile rings, involved some kind of encryption.

– AP



Readers Who Read this Article Also Read



Up Next on Politicoscope

Share this Article: "AUSTRALIA POLITICS: Turnbull Mulls Contentious Cybersecurity Law"



Since You’re Here, We Would Like to ask You for Help
There are more readers worldwide reading the Politicoscope daily news content than ever before. Unlike many other news media organisations that charge their readers subscription fees for the same daily news content and features we offer you for free, we do not charge all our readers to pay any fee. We depend on online advertising to generate the revenues to fund all these great news content and exclusive features provided to you for free. Currently, advertising revenues are quickly falling which is affecting our ability to offer you free online news content.
If everyone who reads our news content, likes it and helps to support it, we can have future guarantee to offer you with the best daily news content and other amazing features, all for free.
"I visit Politicoscope everyday to read my daily news in world politics. I'm glad it's all for free. On my part, I'm happy to donate monthly so as to continue enjoying these free content because it's actually a small amount from me compared to paid subscriptions by other news organisations. I want to help Politicoscope grow more so that I and other readers can continue to have access to free and exclusive daily online news." - Denise H., from LA, USA.
Help keep Politicoscope alive and grow stronger for you.

Donate Online Today


Politicoscope
By Politicoscope July 14, 2017 12:37
Since You’re Here, We Would Like to ask You for Help
There are more readers worldwide reading the Politicoscope daily news content than ever before. Unlike many other news media organisations that charge their readers subscription fees for the same daily news content and features we offer you for free, we do not charge all our readers to pay any fee. We depend on online advertising to generate the revenues to fund all these great news content and exclusive features provided to you for free. Currently, advertising revenues are quickly falling which is affecting our ability to offer you free online news content.
If everyone who reads our news content, likes it and helps to support it, we can have future guarantee to offer you with the best daily news content and other amazing features, all for free.
"I visit Politicoscope everyday to read my daily news in world politics. I'm glad it's all for free. On my part, I'm happy to donate monthly so as to continue enjoying these free content because it's actually a small amount from me compared to paid subscriptions by other news organisations. I want to help Politicoscope grow more so that I and other readers can continue to have access to free and exclusive daily online news." - Denise H., from LA, USA.
Help keep Politicoscope alive and grow stronger for you.

Donate Online

$
Personal Info

Donation Total: $10.00



What's on Your Mind?