USA POLITICS: Roy Moore Biography

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By Politicoscope September 28, 2017 13:40

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Roy Moore was born on 11 February 1947. Judge Roy Moore is a life-long Alabamian and a committed constitutional conservative that has stood up for liberty and religious freedom his entire career.

Roy’s poetry:
Moore has often spiced up his political rhetoric with live renditions of original verse.
Here’s a snippet from one widely quoted poem. It begins, ruefully:
America the beautiful, or so you used to be.
Land of the Pilgrims’ pride; I’m glad they’ll never see:
Here it gets graphic:
Babies piled in dumpsters, Abortion on demand,
Oh, sweet land of liberty; your house is on the sand.
And so on. He goes on to weave in a message in favor of capital punishment:
Too soft to put a killer in a well deserved tomb,
But brave enough to kill that child before he leaves the womb.
If you want to read more, this October 2015 feature from The Atlantic includes an extended recollection of a poem Moore recited during a convention of Southern Baptists.

Continue below with the full current political topic.

USA POLITICS: Roy Moore Biography

Roy Moore was born on 11 February 1947. Judge Roy Moore is a life-long Alabamian and a committed constitutional conservative that has stood up for liberty and religious freedom his entire career.

Judge Moore graduated from Etowah High School in Attalla, Alabama, in 1965 and from the U.S. Military Academy at West Point in 1969 where he received a Bachelor of Science Degree in Arts and Engineering. He then served in the U.S. Army as a company commander with the Military Police Corps in Vietnam. After the Army, Judge Moore completed his Juris Doctor degree from The University of Alabama School of Law in 1977.

During his legal career, Judge Moore became the first full-time Deputy District Attorney in Etowah County, Alabama, and served in this position from 1977 until 1982. In 1984, Judge Moore undertook private practice of law in Gadsden, Alabama.

In 1992, Judge Moore became a judge of the Sixteenth Judicial Circuit of Alabama and served until his election as Chief Justice of the Alabama Supreme Court in 2000.

In 2003, Judge Moore was removed from his position as Chief Justice by a judicial panel for refusing to remove a Ten Commandments monument that he installed in the rotunda of the Alabama Judicial Building to acknowledge the sovereignty of God.

From 2003 until 2012, Judge Moore served as President of the Foundation for Moral Law in Montgomery, lecturing throughout the Country and filing amicus curiae briefs regarding the United States Constitution in Federal District Courts, State Supreme Courts, U.S. Courts of Appeal and the United States Supreme Court.

Judge Moore was overwhelmingly re-elected by a vote of the people of Alabama as Chief Justice of the Alabama Supreme Court in November of 2012 and took office in January of 2013. In 2016, Judge Moore was suspended for upholding the sanctity of marriage as between one man and one woman. He retired to seek the office of U.S. Senate in 2017.

Judge Moore and his wife, Kayla, have four children and five grandchildren. They are members of First Baptist Church in Gallant, Alabama.

“The Ten Commandments Judge”
Moore gained his nickname even before he was elected statewide, for refusing to take down a hand-carved plaque of the Ten Commandments hanging behind his bench when he was the Etowah County circuit court judge.

In 1995, the American Civil Liberties Union sued over the plaque and Moore’s habit of opening sessions with prayers, saying such actions were unconstitutional and violated the separation of church and state.

“Separation of church and state never meant to separate God from government,” Moore told NPR at the time. “The First Amendment never meant to divide our country from an acknowledgement of God. It’s time to stand up and say, we have a right under our Constitution to acknowledge God.”

The Montgomery Advertiser wrote in a recent profile of Moore that “the original lawsuit was dismissed due to lack of standing, but then-Gov. Fob James — who once pledged to send the National Guard to defend the plaque — sued to get a ruling on the constitutionality of Moore’s actions. In 1996, Montgomery County Judge Charles Price initially ordered Moore to stop the prayer but allowed the Ten Commandments plaque to be displayed; however, he ordered the plaque removed after visiting Moore’s courtroom the following year.”

Eventually, though, the case was dismissed by the Alabama Supreme Court and the plaque got to stay, giving Moore a “new statewide status,” according to the Advertiser.

When he was elected to the Alabama Supreme Court in 2000, Moore took his crusade over the Ten Commandments even further, designing and commissioning a 2 1/2-ton granite monument inscribed with the Ten Commandments to be placed in front of the court.

“Moore had not told his fellow justices he was planning to install the monument, but brought a company in to tape the installation of the monument in the Heflin-Torbert Judicial Building. Sales of the tapes later helped pay for his legal defense fund,” the Advertiser says.

A federal lawsuit was filed over the monument, and in 2002, a federal district judge ruled it was unconstitutional, violating the establishment clause of the Constitution. A deadline for removing the monument came and went in August 2003, and Moore refused to budge. A state panel ruled that Moore had violated the judicial ethics code, and Moore was removed from the bench.

Moore, however, didn’t have any regrets about standing by his beliefs.

“I will not violate my oath,” he told NPR in 2003. “I cannot forsake my conscience. I will not neglect my duty. And I will never, never deny the God upon whom our laws and our country depend.”

Roy’s poetry:
Moore has often spiced up his political rhetoric with live renditions of original verse.
Here’s a snippet from one widely quoted poem. It begins, ruefully:
America the beautiful, or so you used to be.
Land of the Pilgrims’ pride; I’m glad they’ll never see:

Here it gets graphic:
Babies piled in dumpsters, Abortion on demand,
Oh, sweet land of liberty; your house is on the sand.
And so on. He goes on to weave in a message in favor of capital punishment:

Too soft to put a killer in a well deserved tomb,
But brave enough to kill that child before he leaves the womb.
If you want to read more, this October 2015 feature from The Atlantic includes an extended recollection of a poem Moore recited during a convention of Southern Baptists.

Roy Moore beliefs: Things the Republican has said

1. Homosexuality should be illegal

He has likened it to bestiality, and called it “abhorrent, immoral, detestable, a crime against nature, and a violation of the laws of nature and of nature’s God upon which this nation and our laws are predicated”. His refusal to issue marriage certificates to gay couples cost him his place on the bench for a second time.

2. God’s wrath is felt on Earth

Moore has suggested that the 11 September 2001 attacks against the World Trade Center and the Pentagon were a sign of God’s divine anger. “Sounds a little bit like the Pentagon” he remarked after reading a Bible passage about “the great slaughter when the towers will fall”. He has also said that violent crimes in the US such as murder and rape are “happening because we have forgotten God”.

3. ‘Red and yellows’ don’t get along

He appeared to use pejorative racial terms for Asians and Native Americans at a rally this month. “We have blacks and whites fighting, reds and yellows fighting, Democrats and Republicans fighting, men and women fighting. What’s going to unite us? What’s going to bring us back together? A president? A Congress? No. It’s going to be God.”

4. Darwin was wrong

“There’s no such thing as evolution,” he told the Washington Post less than a week before the election. “That we came from a snake? No I don’t believe that.”

5. Islam is a ‘false religion’

It is also a threat to US laws, Moore claims. Over the summer he falsely alleged that Sharia law was already being enforced in parts of the states of Illinois and Indiana, offering no evidence.

6. The law comes from God

“God is the only source of our law, liberty and government,” he said from the debate stage last week.

7. He thinks he’s like Putin

In August he directly praised the Russian president Vladimir Putin for his gay rights stance, saying “maybe he’s more akin to me than I know”. The comment came after he described the US as “the focus of evil in the world” because “we promote a lot of bad things”.

8. Obama might not be US-born

Trump’s predecessor was disqualified to be president, Moore claimed as far back as 2008. The so-called “birther” theory, alleging that Obama was born in Kenya, was heavily promoted by Donald Trump until very late in his campaign.

9. He writes poetry

And he has occasionally been known to give live renditions. One said: “Babies piled in dumpsters, Abortion on demand/ Oh Sweet land of liberty; your house is on the sand.”

10. A Ten Commandments sculpture is worth fighting for

He was dismissed from the Alabama Supreme Court after he refused a federal order to remove a massive stone statue of the Ten Commandments from inside his courthouse.

– Roy Moore Biography / BBC


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Politicoscope
By Politicoscope September 28, 2017 13:40

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Since You’re Here, We Would Like to ask You for Help

There are more readers worldwide reading the Politicoscope daily news content than ever before. Unlike many other news media organisations that charge their readers subscription fees for the same daily news content and features we offer you for free, we do not charge all our readers to pay any fee. We depend on online advertising to generate the revenues to fund all these great news content and exclusive features provided to you for free. Currently, advertising revenues are quickly falling which is affecting our ability to offer you free online news content.
If everyone who reads our news content, likes it and helps to support it, we can have future guarantee to offer you with the best daily news content and other amazing features, all for free.
"I visit Politicoscope everyday to read my daily news in world politics. I'm glad it's all for free. On my part, I'm happy to donate monthly so as to continue enjoying these free content because it's actually a small amount from me compared to paid subscriptions by other news organisations. I want to help Politicoscope grow more so that I and other readers can continue to have access to free and exclusive daily online news." - Denise H., from LA, USA.
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